The woods are heavy, yellow, and fine-grained, and unlike many other aromatic woods, they retain their fragrance for decades.Sandalwood oil is extracted from the woods for use. Sandalwood is the second most expensive wood in the world.Both the wood and the oil produce a distinctive fragrance that has been highly valued for centuries.

Sandalwoods are medium-sized hemiparasitic trees, and part of the same botanical family as European mistletoe. Notable members of this group are Indian sandalwood (Santalum album) and Australian sandalwood (Santalum spicatum); others in the genus also have fragrant wood. These are found in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Australia, Indonesia, Hawaii, and other Pacific Islands.

Santalum album

Santalum album is a threatened species indigenous to South India, and grows in the Western Ghats and a few other mountain ranges such as the Kalrayan and Shevaroy Hills. Although sandalwood trees in India.
Santalum album, or Indian sandalwood, is a small tropical tree, and is the most commonly known source of sandalwood. It is native to India, Indonesia, and the Malay Archipelago.[2] Certain cultures place great significance on its fragrant and medicinal qualities. It is also considered sacred in some religions and is used in different religious traditions. The high value of the species has caused its past exploitation, to the point where the wild population is vulnerable to extinction. Indian sandalwood still commands high prices for its essential oil, but due to lack of sizable trees it is no longer used for fine woodworking as before. The plant is widely cultivated and long lived, although harvest is viable after 40 years.

Santalum spicatum

Santalum spicatum, the Australian sandalwood, is a tree native to semiarid[1] areas at the edge of Southwest Australia. The Noongar peoples know the plant as uilarac, waang, wolgol or wollgat. It is traded as sandalwood, and its valuable oil has been used as an aromatic, a medicine, and a food source. Santalum spicatum is one of four high-value Santalum species occurring in Australia.

4 thoughts on “Sandalwood History

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